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There are a number of treatment options in managing Insomnia. A health care professional will evaluate your sleep experience, sleep schedule, and your daily routine. A thorough medical history and physical examination may be called for.

After a a complete examination and medical history, your physician may send you for a sleep study. A sleep study may determine which treatment options are right for the you.

Behavioral Treatment

Because of the close connection between behavior and insomnia, behavioral therapy is often part of any treatment for insomnia. This is because people with insomnia may begin to associate certain sleep-related stimuli with being awake. A combination of several behavioral treatments is typically the most effective approach. Some examples of behavioral treatments are:

  • Stimulus Control Therapy: creating a sleep environment that promotes sleep
  • Cognitive Therapy: learning to develop positive thoughts and beliefs about sleep
  • Sleep Restriction: following a program that limits time in bed in order to get to sleep and stay asleep throughout the night

Relaxation techniques, such as yoga, meditation, and guided imagery may be especially helpful in preparing the body to sleep. Exercise, done early in the day, can also be helpful in reducing stress and promoting deeper sleep.

Medication Treatment

Behavioral therapies alone may not be enough. Treating insomnia with medication is the most common treatment for these sleep problems, particularly once a combination of behavioral approaches has been tried. Sleep medications for the treatment of insomnia are called hypnotics. They should only be taken when:

  • The cause of your insomnia has been evaluated
  • The sleep problems are causing difficulties with your daily activities
  • Appropriate sleep promoting behaviors have been addressed